Dow's Vintage Port 2000

$99.99
$89.99

SKU 9479902061

750ml

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Deep purple colour, so dark it's almost blue/black. This is a wine of great vigour with excellent fruit aromas of plums and cassis. In the mouth, typically Dow flavours of liquorice and spices, as well as great depth and structure. It presents amazing ripe fruit flavours giving it marvellous complexity, finishing with firm bold tannin and a typical peppery dryness. A wine guaranteed to last and develop to maximum potential.
Category Port
Varietals
Country Portugal
Region Douro
Brand Dow's
Alcohol/vol 20%
  • we95

Wine EnthusiastAn impressively concentrated wine, showing the hallmark Dow's dry edge, but still full of ripe fruit, flavors of black plums and berries. It has weight and spice, but also a delicious perfume, layered through a smooth, opulent texture.

Roger Voss, October 1, 2009
  • wa94

Wine AdvocateAn opaque blue/purple color (typical of this vintage's top offerings) is followed by a strikingly provocative aromatic display (flowers, licorice, blackberries, and cassis). This firmly-structured, classic, tightly-knit, restrained port exhibits brilliant purity as well as impressive intensity. While not the most dramatic or flamboyant, it is a beautiful, classically structured port that will age gracefully. Anticipated maturity: 2008-2030.

Robert Parker, October 2002
  • st93

International Wine CellarSaturated bright ruby. Primary, backward aromas of cassis, redcurrant, licorice, minerals, bitter chocolate and spices. Penetrating, structured and powerful. Not hugely sweet but boasts superb flavor definition and impressive extract. A very unevolved port that's best today on the expanding finish, which features notes of cassis, violet, dark chocolate and peaty earth and terrific grip and thrust.

Stephen Tanzer, January 2003
  • ws93

Wine SpectatorVery grapey, with lots of black licorice and blackberry character. Full-bodied, with ultrafine tannins and a long, exquisite finish. Refined and well-made. Best after 2012. 9,000 cases made.

James Suckling, May 15, 2003